Review on Plant Mediated Green Synthesis of Magnetite Nanoparticles for Pollution Abatement, Biomedical and Electronic Applications

J. Laxmi Mangamma1,2,*,, Dharamasoth Rama Devi3,, P.S.R. Vidya Sagar1,, M. Ramesh Babu1, and Keloth Basavaiah1,*,

1Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam-530003, India

2Govt. Degree College, Chodavaram, India

3AU College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam-530003, India

*Corresponding authors: E-mail: laxmichemistry1@gmail.com; klbasu@gmail.com

Abstract

In nature, the iron oxide is found in various forms. It is chemically mixed to form iron oxides (compounds). Magnetite has helpful uses in different areas, such as medicinal carriers, MRI-contracting agents, tumour therapies, industrial, laboratory dyes adsorption and wastewater treatment of toxic metals such as mercury and arsenic. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are generated using various methods such as wet, dry or microbiological processes. The drawbacks of conventional nanoparticles including attrition and pyrolysis include a defective surface formation, poor efficiency rates, high development costs and high energy consumption. The first approach is the green biosynthesis of the nanoparticles in which the metal atoms are clusters. The organic compounds can both minimize and cover nanoparticles in the process of synthesis in green materials. In recent years, nanocarriers, especially for poorly soluble medicines, have received growing attention for oral chemotherapy. Early disease bacteria, biopsy, cells, DNA, glucose and viruses are identified by biosensing. While several basic characteristics have different advantages and potential for biomedical use of magnets of iron oxides, more toxicological research is required on as-synthesized magnet iron oxide nanoparticles with clearly defined requirements for toxicity assessment.

Keywords

Metal oxide nanoparticles, Magnetite, Hyperthermia, Biosensors.

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